Hi, Caroline Jones.

On March 4th, we performed an X-ray of the lungs. Here are your results.

Chest Anatomy

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  Tap any area on the diagram above to read a brief description of its function.

  Move your cursor over the diagram to read a brief description of each area.

Left Upper Lobe

The top part of the left lung. The left lung has only two main sections or “lobes”, whereas the right lung has three. The upper lobe is separated from the lower lobe by a long cleft called the “major fissure”. The lower front part of the left upper lobe is sometimes called the “lingula” because it has a tounge-like shape.

Right Middle Lobe

The smallest of the three sections of the right lung, located toward the front and below the upper lobe. The middle lobe is separated from the upper lobe by a cleft called the “minor fissure”.

Right Upper Lobe

The top part of the right lung. The right lung has three main sections or “lobes”. The upper lobe is separted from the middle and lower lobes by two long clefts called “fissures”. The major fissure separates the upper and lower lobe, and the minor fissure separates the upper and middle lobes.

Right Lower Lung

The bottom part of the right lung. The right lung has three main sections or “lobes”. The lower lobe is separted from the upper lobe by a long cleft called the “major fissure”.

Left Lower Lobe

The bottom part of the left lung. The left lung has only two main sections or “lobes”, whereas the right lung has three. The left lower lobe is separated from the upper lobe by a long cleft called the “major fissure”.

Lower Airways

The airways are the system of tubes that carry air into and out of the lungs as we breathe. The trachea (windpipe) is the main airway. Inside the chest, the windpipe divides into two main branches (one for each lung), which then divide further into smaller and smaller tubes, much like the branches of a tree. This system allows air to reach all parts of the lungs.

Left Main Bronchus

Large tube carrying air to and from the left lung. As it enters the lung, the main bronchus divides into smaller and smaller tubes, similar to the branches of a tree.

Right Main Bronchus

Large tube carrying air to and from the right lung. As it enters the lung, the main bronchus divides into smaller and smaller tubes, similar to the branches of a tree.

Thyroid Gland

The thyroid gland is a small butterfly-shaped organ located in the front of the neck just above the breast bone. The thyroid gland makes hormones which help with metabolism (how the body uses fuel and produces energy). There are two lobes of the thyroid gland (right and left), which are connected by a thin band in the middle called the isthmus.

Thyroid Isthmus

Thin band of thyroid tissue that crosses in front of the windpipe, and connects the right and left lobes of the thyroid gland.

Upper Airway

The upper airway includes the throat area, the voicebox (larynx), and the upper part of the windpipe (trachea). As air passess through the voicebox, the vocal cords come together and allow us to produce sounds and speech. The upper part of the windpipe has rings made of cartilage (strong but flexible material) that help hold the airway open and protect it.

Heart

The heart is a specialized muscle that pumps blood to all the organs of the body. The heart has a right and a left side (each with 2 chambers). The right side pumps blood to the lungs and the left side pumps blood to the rest of the body. The heart is located in the center of the chest, between the lungs.

Full Report

Below is the original text of your brain MRI report.

Helpful explanations about each section are interspersed with the original report text (shown in blue).

Tap any highlighted term to read about its meaning.

Full Report

Here is the original text of your brain MRI report.

Click on any highlighted term to read about its meaning.

Explanation

This side explains the sections of your MRI report to help you understand how your radiologist examines the images of your brain.

Indication: 786.50 Chest pain, unspecified, chest pain

The indication section states the reason why your doctor ordered this particular study. Often there will be diagnostic code information included in this section. The diagnostic code information may list symptoms or health conditions potentially related to the reasons why you and your doctor thought you needed the imaging study.

Comparison Exams: XR CHEST PA AND LATERAL

The comparison section lists any studies you had done in the past that were referenced to see if there were any changes.

Findings: Normal cardiac and mediastinal contours. Heart size is normal. Postsurgical changes are noted at the left lung apex . Heterogeneous opacities at the left lung base. Mild blunting of the left costophrenic angle. Partially visualized cervical fixation hardware. No acute osseous abnormalities.

This part of the report describes what the radiologist sees on your images. The radiologist will often comment on both normal and abnormal structures using specific, descriptive medical terms.

Impression: Left lower lobe airspace opacities, possibly atelectasis or infection. Trace left pleural fluid.

What's the next step?

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Ryan Short

Ryan Short MD

Duke Radiology

919-100-2000