Hi, Mary Smith.

On April 12th, we performed a MRI of the Lumbar Spine. Here are your results.

Spine Anatomy

iPhone 6 Plus Copy 11 Created with Sketch. Lumbar L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 S1 Spine (Click or Hover)

  Tap any area on the diagram above to read a brief description of its function.

  Click anywhere to enlarge or hide lumbar spine diagram. Move your cursor over the diagram to read a brief description of each area.

Cervical

The neck region of the spine, which is made up of 7 bones (C1 through C7). In-between the bones are discs (soft cushion material) which act as shock absorbers. The cervical spine protects the upper part of the spinal cord, which is important for carrying messages from the brain to the rest of the body, and for vital functions like breathing.

Thoracic

The part of the spine that goes through the chest area, or the mid/upper back. There are 12 thoracic vertebral bodies, and each one attaches to a set of ribs (right and left ).

Lumbar

The low back. The lower part of the spine (from just below the rib cage to about the level of the hip bones) is called the "lumbar spine". There are usually 5 lumbar spine bones (vertebrae). The lumbar spine is between the thoracic spine (above) and the sacrum (below).

Sacrum

A large triangle-shaped bone in the very low back, below the lumbar spine and just above the tailbone (between the hip bones). The sacrum is made up of 5 bones that typically fuse during early adulthood.

Coccyx

“Tailbone”. This is the very lower end of the spine. It is usually made up of 4 small bones that often fuse during adulthood.

Spinous Process

A bony projection pointing backward from each vertebral body. This is the part you can feel when you push on the middle of your back. Some muscles and ligaments attach here.

Intervertebral Discs

The rubbery cushion-like pads between spine bones, which act as a shock absorbers for the spine. Normally, this padding maintains a space between each bone, called the "disc space".

Disc Space

The area between spine bones where a disc separates the bone above from the bone below. The disc is like a cushion or pad between the spine bones (vertebrae). Normally, this padding maintains a space between each bone, called the "disc space".

Facet Joint

Each spine bone is anchored to the level above and below by bony struts called facets. The attachment point between the facets is called the "facet joint". These joints allow the spine to flex and extend (bend forward and back), while maintaining stability. There are two facet joints (right and left) connecting each level of the spine.

Sacrum

A large triangle-shaped bone in the very low back, below the lumbar spine and just above the tailbone (between the hip bones). The sacrum is made up of 5 bones that typically fuse during early adulthood.

Coccyx

“Tailbone”. This is the very lower end of the spine. It is usually made up of 4 small bones that often fuse during adulthood.

Full Report

Below is the original text of your brain MRI report.

Helpful explanations about each section are interspersed with the original report text (shown in blue).

Tap any highlighted term to read about its meaning.

Full Report

Here is the original text of your brain MRI report.

Click on any highlighted term to read about its meaning.

Explanation

This side explains the sections of your MRI report to help you understand how your radiologist examines the images of your brain.

Indication: M54.56 Low back pain, Lumbar region

The indication section states the reason why your doctor ordered this particular study. Often there will be diagnostic code information included in this section. The diagnostic code information may list symptoms or health conditions potentially related to the reasons why you and your doctor thought you needed the imaging study.

Comparison Exams: CT MRI Lumbar Spine without contrast

The comparison section lists any studies you had done in the past that were referenced to see if there were any changes.

Findings:

This part of the report describes what the radiologist sees on your images. The radiologist will often comment on both normal and abnormal structures using specific, descriptive medical terms.

Marrow signal is normal.

The conus medullaris terminates at approximately L1. Normal alignment.There is mild anterior height loss at L3, unchanged compared with the prior radiographs. Vertebral body height is otherwise maintained.

Mild disc desiccation at L2/L3, L3/L4, and L4/L5. Small posterior disc bulge at L4/L5 indents the thecal sac. No significant spinal canal stenosis. Moderate bilateral neuroforaminal stenosis at L5/S1. Moderate facet arthropathy at L5/S1. Visualized portion of the sacrum is normal. Visualized paraspinous and retroperitoneal soft tissues are unremarkable.

Impression:

1. Moderate bilateral neuroforaminal stenosis and facet arthropathy at L5/S1.

2. Small disc bulge at L4/L5 without spinal canal or foraminal stenosis.

3. Chronic L3 compression fracture, unchanged from prior radiographs.

What's the next step?

If your radiologist recommends it, you can schedule a follow-up online or by phone using the button below.

Schedule an appointment

Need more information?

We're available to talk if you have any questions or concerns about your scan.

Message your radiologist
Ryan Short

Ryan Short MD

Duke Radiology

919-100-2000