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Wrist X-Ray 3 Views

Performed March 19, 2021

Dr. Nicholas Befera

Report by Dr. Nicholas Befera

This is a fictional sample report for demonstration purposes only

EXAMINATION: WRIST XRAY COMPLETE MINIMUM OF 3 VIEWS LT, FOREARM XRAY 2 VIEWS LT

DATE OF EXAM: 3/19/21

HISTORY: Recent trauma.

COMPARISON: None.

FINDINGS:

Bones: No acute fracture. Bone mineralization is within normal limits

Joints: Alignment is normal. Joint space narrowing and osteophytosis of the triscaphe joint. Mild first carpometacarpal joint osteoarthrosis. Well-corticated fragmented appearance of the ulnar styloid. Subchondral cystic change along the distal radius articular surface.

Soft tissues: Unremarkable. No soft tissue edema.

IMPRESSION:

1. No fracture or acute osseous abnormality.

2. There is degenerative change throughout the wrist, most pronounced at the first carpal metacarpal and triscaphe joint.

3. Fragmented appearance of the ulnar styloid, likely related to remote injury.

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Definitions will appear here when you underlined words!

Bones

Bones are the strong, hard structures that make up the skeleton. Bones are made of a calcium and other elements, and play many important roles in the body including storage of calcium, and creation of blood cells in the bone marrow. While they may not seem alive, bones are living structures which grow, remodel, and adapt to stress and strain.

FOREARM

The part of the arm between the elbow and the wrist. The forearm is made up of two long bones called the radius and ulna.

EXAMINATION

radiology test, such as MRI, CT, or x-ray images

WRIST

The joint that connects the hand to the forearm. Includes the ends of the forearm bones (radius and ulna), and 8 small wrist bones (carpals) near the base of the hand. These bones are connected by strong fibrous bands (ligaments) which give the joint strength and flexibility.

XRAY

An x-ray image. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of the body. The pictures will show different body tissues (bones, muscle, fat, etc.) in shades of black and white, since each tissue type absorbs a different amount of x-rays. X-rays are also used to create CT scan images.

3 VIEWS

X-rays taken from three different viewpoints.

LT

Left

XRAY

An x-ray image. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of the body. The pictures will show different body tissues (bones, muscle, fat, etc.) in shades of black and white, since each tissue type absorbs a different amount of x-rays. X-rays are also used to create CT scan images.

2 VIEWS

Two x-rays taken from different perspectives. For example, a front view and a side view.

EXAM

a scan or imaging test (MRI, CT, ultrasound, x-ray, etc)

HISTORY

Medical backstory, or the reason for having the imaging test.

trauma

A physical injury.

COMPARISON

The comparison section lists any old x-rays or scans that the radiologist looked at to see if there were any changes.

FINDINGS

In radiology, findings are the observations that the radiologist makes when looking at the images.

No acute fracture

No sign of any new broken bones. This is normal.

Bone mineralization is within normal limits

Normal bone density. Mineralization refers to the amount of calcium (hard mineral) in the bone structure.

Joints

connections between bones. The bones are held together at joints by ligaments (fibrous bands that connect bone-to-bone). Joints are points of connection between two bones, and in some cases allow the bones to move relative to one another. There are different types of joints in the body: for example, the knee joint works like a hinge, the shoulder joint is a ball and socket, and the collarbone-joint is fixed.

Alignment is normal

The way that two bones are lined up with one another at a joint. Normally, bones are lined up perfectly. When a joint is dislocated, the bones are offset and no longer lign up together.

Joint space narrowing

Decrease in the amount of space between bones of a joint, caused by thinning of the cartilage or cushioning between bones. This is often related to arthritis, or to the wear-and-tear of aging.

osteophytosis

Development of bone spurs along a bone or joint. This can be related to arthritis or wear-and-tear changes.

triscaphe joint

Name for the joint between 3 of the small bones of the wrist (carpal bones), where the 3 bones come together. This joint is near the base of the thumb.

Mild

a small amount, a little bit, not much

first carpometacarpal joint

This is a joint at the base of the thumb near the wrist, where the long bone to the thumb (first metacarpal) attaches to one of the wrist bones (carpals). This is a common site for arthritis and wear-and-tear changes.

osteoarthrosis

Age-related changes seen in the bones and joints over time. Examples are narrowing of the joint space between bones due to wearing down of cartilage, and the development of bone spurs. This is commonly seen in the joints with aging, but the amount of change varies from person to person.

Well-corticated

A bone fragment that has smooth, well-formed edges. The smooth (not jagged) bony edges suggest that the fragment has likely been around for a long time and is not new.

fragmented appearance

looks to be in multiple pieces or parts

ulnar styloid

A normal small rounded protrusion of bone at the far end of the ulna (forearm bone) near the wrist on the same side as the little finger. The ulnar styloid makes up part of the wrist joint. It is common for this bone to be injured along with the other wrist bone (radius) from a fall onto an outstretched hand.

Subchondral cystic change

Small spaces or depressions forming in a bone along a joint, just beneath the cartilage (shock absorbing tissue). This is a sign of wear-and-tear changes or athritis, more common in older patients.

distal radius

The far end of the radius (forearm bone), at the wrist.

articular surface

The part of a bone that faces into the joint.

Soft tissues

Body tissues other than bone. Soft tissues include muscle, fat, and skin (among others).

Unremarkable

normal, nothing worth commenting on

soft tissue

Body tissue other than bone. Soft tissues include muscle, fat, and skin (among others).

edema

swelling or fluid accumulation in the tissues

IMPRESSION

The Impression is the summary of what the radiologist saw on the scan, containing the most important or relevant observations. Not everything the radiologist commented on will be included in the impression, only the most important things that the radiologist wants to communicate.

No fracture

There are no broken bones.

acute osseous abnormality

New problem or abnormal finding in the bones. This would include things like a broken bone (fracture) or signs of bone infection. Osseous means having to do with the bones.

degenerative change

Changes from wear-and-tear or aging, often called arthritis. These changes are common with aging as we use our joints over many years. Examples are narrowing of the joint space between bones, and the development of bones spurs.

wrist

The joint that connects the hand to the forearm. Includes the ends of the forearm bones (radius and ulna), and 8 small wrist bones (carpals) near the base of the hand. These bones are connected by strong fibrous bands (ligaments) which give the joint strength and flexibility.

most pronounced

most obvious or noticeable

first carpal metacarpal

Having to do with the joint at the base of the thumb near the wrist, where the long bone to the thumb attaches to the wrist bones. This is a common site for arthritis and wear-and-tear changes.

joints

connections between bones. The bones are held together at joints by ligaments (fibrous bands that connect bone-to-bone). Joints are points of connection between two bones, and in some cases allow the bones to move relative to one another. There are different types of joints in the body: for example, the knee joint works like a hinge, the shoulder joint is a ball and socket, and the collarbone-joint is fixed.

Fragmented appearance

looks to be in multiple pieces or parts

likely related to remote injury

Probably from an old injury that happened in the past.